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Norbury
Template:R-I Template:R-I Template:R-I Template:R-I
File:Norbury999.JPG
LocationNorbury
Local authorityLondon Borough of Croydon
Managed bySouthern
Station codeNRB
Number of platforms4 (2 of which are rarely used)
AccessibleHandicapped/disabled access [1]
Fare zone3

National Rail annual entry and exit
2004–051.465 million[2]
2005–061.591 million[2]
2006–072.472 million[2]
2008–092.551 million[2]
2009–102.572 million[2]
2010–112.909 million[2]

1878Opened

Lists of stations*DLR
External links*Departures
  • Layout
  • Facilities
  • Buses
  • Template:Portal-inline
    Template:Portal-inlineCoordinates: 51°24′41″N 0°07′17″W / 51.4114°N 0.1214°W / 51.4114; -0.1214

    Norbury railway station is in the London Borough of Croydon in south London Template:Convert/mi miles from Victoria.[3] The station is operated by Southern, who also provide the majority of services (the only exceptions being two early morning departures operated by First Capital Connect[4]) and is in Travelcard Zone 3.

    Ticket barriers are in operation at this station.

    Service[]

    The typical off-peak train service per hour is:

    [5]

    History[]

    The Balham Hill and East Croydon line was constructed by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LB&SCR) as a short-cut on the Brighton Main Line to London Victoria, avoiding Crystal Palace and Norwood Junction. It was opened on 1 December 1862.[6] Norbury station was not however opened until January 1878, as the surrounding area was very rural.[7] The station was rebuilt in 1903 when the lines were quadrupled.[8] In 1912 the lines were electrified.[9]

    Ticket gates were installed in 2009.

    A Victorian racetrack, dating from 1868, held the ‘Streatham Races’ in the fields (which were the sports ground of the National Westminster/NatWest Bank) that formed part of the old Lonesome Farm. The race meetings attracted huge crowds of racegoers, bookies and other notorious characters. The course also included a water jump across the River Graveney. Sadly, this exciting but disreputable period of history came to an end in 1878 when the Racecourse Licensing Act banned racecourses within a radius of 10 miles of London.

    References[]

    1. Template:Citation step free south east rail
    2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Template:Citation ORR rail usage data
    3. Body, Geoffrey (1989). PSL field guide to the railways of Southern Region. Wellingborough: Patrick stephens Ltd., 171.. ISBN 1-85260-297-X. 
    4. FCC. First Capital Connect Timetable - Table 3 - Sutton and Wimbledon to London.
    5. http://www.southernrailway.com
    6. Turner, John Howard (1978). The London Brighton and South Coast Railway 2 Establishment and Growth. Batsford. ISBN 0-7134-1198-8.  p. 126-8.
    7. Turner, John Howard (1979). The London Brighton and South Coast Railway 3 Completion and Maturity. Batsford. ISBN 0-7134-1389-1.  p. 144-8.
    8. Turner (1979), p. 149.
    9. Turner, J.T. Howard (1979) pp.91, 177-8.

    External links[]

    Template:Commons category

    Preceding station National Rail logo.svg.png National Rail Following station
    Streatham Common   Southern
    Sutton & Mole Valley Line
      Thornton Heath
    Streatham Common   Southern
    Brighton Main Line and West London Line
      Thornton Heath
    Streatham Common   Southern
    London Bridge to West Croydon
      Thornton Heath


    Template:London-railstation-stub

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